Why are Some Drugs Rare?

Why are Some Drugs Rare?

Making a decision is a gamble. In life, we all need money. For that reason, we do things we thought are beneficial for us to gain more. But then again there are instances in which we are just used up for the benefit of those in authority.

This may not sound clear but take this as an example: A singer or a musician is extremely passionate with his or her work. His or her manager does everything just to let this talented person gain fame. But hidden behind the intentions of the manager is more than just for talent’s sake. It can be possible that the manager also desires for a better financial condition.

Then, a recording industry bumps in and offers help and support to the budding artist. If you are the musician, you will eventually grab the opportunity thinking that you will benefit greatly from it. However, you are going to need to go through commissions in order to make ends meet.

The case is not just happening in the music industry; it can happen in any field even in the pharmaceutical area. You may not believe it but there are people who thought that a certain disease can never be cured only to find out that there is a drug available to treat the said disease. This is consequential.

In this blog, Well Future Pharmacy will be talking about why some drugs are rare. We believe that we are the most credible people to answer this question for the reason that we have been providing medication compounding in Michigan Avenue Chicago Illinois.

So here are reasons why some medicines are uncommon:

  • Difficulty in Production

    The number one reason why we think drugs are expensive is because we thought manufacturers are only producing these drugs for the sake of those who have the ability to pay. But that is entirely false.

    There are some drugs, known as monoclonal antibodies. According to Wikipedia, a monoclonal antibody is an “[antibody] that are made by identical immune cells that are all clones of a unique parent cell.” If the treatment to a specific disease needs this kind of drug, it would be nearly impossible for it to be available in the market, let alone in a pharmacy.

    But with the recent advancement of technology, the price of the production of monoclonal antibodies is now 5% of the selling price. There are now cheap generics of these kinds of drugs but we cannot deny that these are still part of our rare drugs in the market.

    We still have a long way to go but hopefully we will finally reach a point of time where monoclonal antibodies can be available for those who badly need them.

  • Customer’s Ability to Pay

    There is a reason why manufacturers, no matter what product they produce, need to set a selling price. If you are a customer and you want to buy a piece of bread, you obviously want it.

    But if we apply that system, all our resources will eventually be depleted because everybody is just consuming products here and there.

    The marketing staffs of pharmaceutical companies are the finest in the bunch. They know and consider the price of production as well as anticipate and recognize a person’s ability to pay in order to maximize the profit.

    If you are producing a drug and only a few of the overall population is in need of that specific drug, it would make sense for you to not produce a bunch of it. Thus, that drug will be deemed “rare” in the market.

    These instances have not been reported in the media. However, let us try to look at the possibility. Producing drugs involves marketing. The ingredients of the drug are just one of the considerations of its cost, not to mention the labor needed to produce that drug.

    The bottom line is: let us not point a finger to people. There is a reason why a certain thing happens and there are consequences that need to be considered.


Disclaimer

Blogs, content and other media uploaded online are for informational purposes only. Contents on this website should not be considered medical advice. Readers are strongly encouraged to visit their physician for health-related issues.


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